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Discussion Starter #1
My question is this--after putting on the trigger and testing it multiple times--the break to fire appears all the way to the bottom. When pulling the trigger 1/2 way-like the break on a regular gun-then it gets stiff and fires at the end of the pull. is this normal--do I have to break in the new trigger?

any ideas or is this normal?
 

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The Armory Craft trigger has geometry that I don't like as well as gray guns or even the stock flat trigger. The trigger will not break in.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The Armory Craft trigger has geometry that I don't like as well as gray guns or even the stock flat trigger. The trigger will not break in.
I had the flat trigger on it, but I also bought a curved 365 trigger and I got this armory craft trigger. I put on the armory craft trigger, but it seems the breakpoint is 90degrees but the striker release(firing)on the trigger is far too late
 

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hoekyb1 was your gun made last year around June? I had one in my 365, didn't care for the flat trigger preferring the curved but it worked fine out of the box. Your trigger needs to be fitted and it should work fine from what I've gathered in other threads of a few who have had an issue like yours. The back shelf of the trigger needs just a little stoning to remove .005 to .015" of material, thickness of a sheet of paper and don't change the angle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hoekyb1 was your gun made last year around June? I had one in my 365, didn't care for the flat trigger preferring the curved but it worked fine out of the box. Your trigger needs to be fitted and it should work fine from what I've gathered in other threads of a few who have had an issue like yours. The back shelf of the trigger needs just a little stoning to remove .005 to .015" of material, thickness of a sheet of paper and don't change the angle.
I'll give it a try
 

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Someone brought the same ting up in one of the facebook SIG groups last night. The owner of Armory Craft replied and explained that while some user 'feel' their flat AC trigger breaks in the back - it actually breaks at the same spot as factory curved trigger. If you care to read the whole thing, his explanation is pretty detailed, but after I read all of that - it makes sense to me and I TOTALLY agree with his assessment of the crappy resting position of the XL trigger:
--------------------------------------------------------------
.... it looks some clarification is due as I am reading a bit of misinformation about our (Armory Craft) triggers and that they break in the back.

Yes and no.
Yes vs. factory flat, no vs. factory curved.

If you compare AC trigger vs. stock p365 curved trigger - they actually break at the SAME POINT. Imagine you make a small dot at the center of the stock curved trigger and you make a small dot at the center of the flat AC trigger. You guessed it: the dots would perfectly overlap where both triggers break.

The thing is, with these small triggers, most of us will "cheat" and will not hold our trigger finger in the middle of the trigger, but will slide it down a little.

This will result in two things:

1) we will experience a perceived lighter trigger pull (while the actual trigger pull is the same as with the stock curved trigger)

2) we will perceive that the trigger breaks further back (while the actual breaking point is IDENTICAL to the stock curved trigger.


Comparison to the factory flat trigger is different and I will explain it next:

Flat factory (XL) trigger is a different animal altogether vs factory curved trigger.

1) unlike the factory curved trigger, XL trigger actually does break at 90 (which of course is GREAT).

2) unfortunately (in my opinion as well as opinion of quite a few others) the penalty for this is quite steep - literally! (pun intended)

Unlike 1911 triggers that glide F/B and break at 90 degrees, hinged triggers were NOT meant to break at 90 degrees. Of course you can force them to break at 90 degrees, but you will end up with less then natural resting trigger position.

This is actually a pretty big deal. If the trigger is tilted too forward for the all-important-first-shot, MANY shooters will have the tendency to caress the SIDE of the trigger instead of placing the trigger finger centrally across the face of the trigger. This of course will certainly result in a pulled shot. Can this be overcome by training? Yes, of course....but in EDC we are talking about instinctive reactions that take fractions of seconds under stress.

If someone has to pull the gun out of the holster in a dire situation, NOBODY is going to think.....Hmm, let's make sure I put my finger in the center of that trigger, let's make sure I don't shank that shot if I pull more on the edge of the trigger instead of placing my finger centrally across.

But as I said above. Things can be overcome be proper training.

Bottom line.....

- as explained in my post above, AC flat trigger brakes at the SAME spot as the factory curved trigger, despite the myths that are being spread out there

- Factory flat triggers are good and of course it is nice that they break a 90°....while the resting position is honestly not ideal.

Your mileage and your experience and opinion may of course vary and that's fine. Thanks for reading and letting me explain our philosophy why we make or don't make our triggers certain way.
 

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Someone brought the same ting up in one of the facebook SIG groups last night. The owner of Armory Craft replied and and explained while some user 'feel' in breaks in the back. If you care to read the explanation is pretty detailed, but after I read all of that - it makes sense to me:
--------------------------------------------------------------
.... it looks some clarification is due as I am reading a bit of misinformation about our (Armory Craft) triggers and that they break in the back.

Yes and no.
Yes vs. factory flat, no vs. factory curved.

If you compare AC trigger vs. stock p365 curved trigger - they actually break at the SAME POINT. Imagine you make a small dot at the center of the stock curved trigger and you make a small dot at the center of the flat AC trigger. You guessed it: the dots would perfectly overlap where both triggers break.

The thing is, with these small triggers, most of us will "cheat" and will not hold our trigger finger in the middle of the trigger, but will slide it down a little.

This will result in two things:

1) we will experience a perceived lighter trigger pull (while the actual trigger pull is the same as with the stock curved trigger)

2) we will perceive that the trigger breaks further back (while the actual breaking point is IDENTICAL to the stock curved trigger.


Comparison to the factory flat trigger is different and I will explain it next:

Flat factory (XL) trigger is a different animal altogether vs factory curved trigger.

1) unlike the factory curved trigger, XL trigger actually does break at 90 (which of course is GREAT).

2) unfortunately (in my opinion as well as opinion of quite a few others) the penalty for this is quite steep - literally! (pun intended)

Unlike 1911 triggers that glide F/B and break at 90 degrees, hinged triggers were NOT meant to break at 90 degrees. Of course you can force them to break at 90 degrees, but you will end up with less then natural resting trigger position.

This is actually a pretty big deal. If the trigger is tilted too forward for the all-important-first-shot, MANY shooters will have the tendency to caress the SIDE of the trigger instead of placing the trigger finger centrally across the face of the trigger. This of course will certainly result in a pulled shot. Can this be overcome by training? Yes, of course....but in EDC we are talking about instinctive reactions that take fractions of seconds under stress.

If someone has to pull the gun out of the holster in a dire situation, NOBODY is going to think.....Hmm, let's make sure I put my finger in the center of that trigger, let's make sure I don't shank that shot if I pull more on the edge of the trigger instead of placing my finger centrally across.

But as I said above. Things can be overcome be proper training.

Bottom line.....

- as explained in my post above, AC flat trigger brakes at the SAME spot as the factory curved trigger, despite the myths that are being spread out there

- Factory flat triggers are good and of course it is nice that they break a 90°....while the resting position is honestly not ideal.

Your mileage and your experience and opinion may of course vary and that's fine. Thanks for reading and letting me explain our philosophy why we make or don't make our triggers certain way.
Thank you for posting. Very interesting and detailed. I appreciate it. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I tried filing the trigger -- it didn't seem to make much difference. I'll look things over and make a decision.
 

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Well, I tried filing the trigger -- it didn't seem to make much difference. I'll look things over and make a decision.
Did you call Armory Craft ? I am sure they will be able to help you. Per my experience, calling any vendor directly with product related issues, usually yields better and faster results than making Facebook or forum posts.
 
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