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While I could see a .380 P365 selling to some folks, the truth is it's designed around the 9mm and a .380 version would likely have problems. It's not as simple as drilling a different-sized hole in the barrel. The .380 has a fairly weak recoil impulse compared to the 9mm and the recoil and striker springs would have to be weakened to match. There's a reason why most .380s on the market are straight blowback.
While I agree with some of the points above, I cannot let the rest slide.

The most obvious part to question is that a tiny minority of .380 guns on the market are blowback operated. In fact, there are only two that sell at all: RIA Baby Rock and Walther PPK/S (the American repro). In addition, two are delayed blowback: Seecamp and Walther CCP. But among the most selling, all are locked breech, recoil operated guns: all the Colt Mustang clones (SIG P238, Kimber Micro, Springfield 911), Glock 42 (which alone would demolish that claim), KelTec P-3AT and its clone Ruger LCP, Ruger LCP II, S&W 380EZ, SCCY CPX-3, Kahr P380/CW380, Browning 1911-380.

We may argue back and forth about blowback guns being the majority of the existing fleet, given that they were the mainstay of the market for a century. But as far as mechanical reliability and performace go, it's proven that a locked breech .380 guns deliver indisputable advantages (mostly in the recoil reduction), and nobody in their right mind would design a new blowback operated .380 anymore.

A less obvious problem assumption is that the recoil spring must be lighter on a .380 gun. It can be done so, but what chiefly determines the power of the spring are two things: the reciprocating mass (e.g. slide plus barrel), and the force required to strip and feed the cartridge. The light spring of 380EZ is chiefly made possible by its magazine design. Just try to rack a Kahr P380, you'll see.

It is not to say that re-chambering P365 is going to be without a challenge, although it's going to arise from an unexpected direction. For example, the blunt-nosed bullet and short overall length of the .380 cartridge can easily cause difficulties. No small name than Glock had to learn it firsthand, when these blunt bullets started hitting the slide stop of Glock 42.

When P365 hits the market, shooters ought to evaluate its reliability all over again.
 

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While I could see a .380 P365 selling to some folks, the truth is it's designed around the 9mm and a .380 version would likely have problems. It's not as simple as drilling a different-sized hole in the barrel. The .380 has a fairly weak recoil impulse compared to the 9mm and the recoil and striker springs would have to be weakened to match. There's a reason why most .380s on the market are straight blowback.
Or they could do what Bersa did with their BPcc: Keep everything identical except put a shim in the magazines to fit the shorter .380 cartridge. I am not kidding one bit: I had one and looked for parts specific to the .380. Other than magazines there was not one part that was labeled .380. Not one. That gun was great in some ways: It would eat absolutely anything, no misfires ever, and it was accurate.

Unfortunately it was in all respects a 9mm and I could not longer rack the slide due to arthritis, so it got traded in for a Shield .380 EZ. Of course that gun has its own set of problems, but racking the slide, loading magazines, field stripping and cleaning are EZ. I do not trust her for a self defense gun but she is fun on the range and gets to come out and play from time to time. In fact, she came along on my last two range trips.
 

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Or they could do what Bersa did with their BPcc: Keep everything identical except put a shim in the magazines to fit the shorter .380 cartridge. I am not kidding one bit: I had one and looked for parts specific to the .380. Other than magazines there was not one part that was labeled .380. Not one. That gun was great in some ways: It would eat absolutely anything, no misfires ever, and it was accurate.

Unfortunately it was in all respects a 9mm and I could not longer rack the slide due to arthritis, so it got traded in for a Shield .380 EZ. Of course that gun has its own set of problems, but racking the slide, loading magazines, field stripping and cleaning are EZ. I do not trust her for a self defense gun but she is fun on the range and gets to come out and play from time to time. In fact, she came along on my last two range trips.
That's interesting, I would think at least the barrel would have to be swapped as well.
What's the .380 EZ magazine feature?
It's supposed to be easier to load ammo in. I imagine there's less tension in the spring compared to a typical mag. That has to be a fine line to walk though. I could guess some people experience feed issues because of that.
 

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That's interesting, I would think at least the barrel would have to be swapped as well.

It's supposed to be easier to load ammo in. I imagine there's less tension in the spring compared to a typical mag. That has to be a fine line to walk though. I could guess some people experience feed issues because of that.
No need to change the barrel since the casings and bullets are the same diameter. The only difference is that the casings are shorter, thus containing less powder.

I still use my UpLula to load the magazines because the knob on the side of them is hard on your thumb. And YES a lot, lot, lot of people experience feed issues because of those softer springs in the Shield EZ - both the .380 and the 9mm versions. What mine did, not every time but often, was stovepipe the last round straight up instead of feeding it into the feed ramp of the barrel. Always the last round, no matter how many rounds were in the magazine initially. Keeping the magazines immaculate and stretching the magazine springs helped my gun. Others' results may vary.
 

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No need to change the barrel since the casings and bullets are the same diameter. The only difference is that the casings are shorter, thus containing less powder.

I still use my UpLula to load the magazines because the knob on the side of them is hard on your thumb. And YES a lot, lot, lot of people experience feed issues because of those softer springs in the Shield EZ - both the .380 and the 9mm versions. What mine did, not every time but often, was stovepipe the last round straight up instead of feeding it into the feed ramp of the barrel. Always the last round, no matter how many rounds were in the magazine initially. Keeping the magazines immaculate and stretching the magazine springs helped my gun. Others' results may vary.
Ah yeah that makes sense
 

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No need to change the barrel since the casings and bullets are the same diameter. The only difference is that the casings are shorter, thus containing less powder.
So wouldn't you need a barrel with a shorter chamber? I believe these cartridges headspace on the case mouth, so a .380 would not work in a 9mm chamber.
 

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So after the video from TFB, Tom Taylor said there will other models with the 365. The only logical 3 are .22LR, .380 and .40-which I seriously doubt there will be a .40
There's a post in this group's parent forum (Sig Sauer Pistols) that details an announcement from Sig that they are discontinuing .40 altogether, apparently across all their offerings.

Here's the quote:
Six days ago I remember reading a saying all .40 cal has been removed from the sig website. I had to check myself and sure enough it was. I emailed them and just got a response today.


Thank you for contacting Sig Sauer.

Due to the popularity of other calibers many of our current models in .40 have been discontinued and it remains to be seen if we will be resuming manufacturing in .40 again in the future.

Regards,
Aaron Weeden

Sorry if this has already been posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
Yup, as I mentioned-seriously doubt there will be a .40. In my opinion, they should add a very small but helpful feature to the slide-maybe 1/8" ears machined into the rear portion, or scallop/recess the area directly in front of the rear portion.
A .22 conversion would be awesome. Mainly as a starter gun.
 

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So wouldn't you need a barrel with a shorter chamber? I believe these cartridges headspace on the case mouth, so a .380 would not work in a 9mm chamber.
I wrote the details of how Bersa turned their 9mm BPcc into a .380. I specifically said there was nothing different except for Bersa having putting a shim in the magazines. The gun worked perfectly for the entire time I owned it and shot well over 1,000 rounds through it. Period.

If you don't believe me, look it up for yourself. The Bersa parts list does not list a picture or an individual part number for the barrel of the .380. And, different subject, but also interesting is that the recoil spring assembly is the same part number for 380, 9mm and .40 cal.

Of course: All of this has nothing to do with what SIG would do if making a existing gun in a different caliber.
 

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Unless the slide racking is easier and the recoil milder.......it will be a waste of space. IMHO
I'm sure SIG knows that, so let's hope they don't follow in the footsteps of Kahr's CW380 that nearly takes a Gorilla to rack. 🥺
 

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The EZ is perfect for women or men with grip issues. The mag has the little assisted knobs that help load mags but Are not friendly to your fingers. I use a a rag to help hold on to the knobs. My wife really likes it in 380.

I like other posters here are wondering why 380 would not work in the p365 9mm. Shells being shorter really hurt the barrel?
Would the shorter rounds not be picked up out of the mag?
would the mag need a spacer in the back? Not much difference in shell length.
 

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I wrote the details of how Bersa turned their 9mm BPcc into a .380. I specifically said there was nothing different except for Bersa having putting a shim in the magazines.
Barrels on BP9CC and BP380CC are drastically different. It's a fact that website being incomplete cannot change. BP380CC is blowback operated, while BP9CC is a Browning style action. Therefore, the tail ends of the barrels are nothing alike. BP9CC barrel has a diagonal cut that controls the barrel tilting, when BP380CC has a square notch. Its barrel does not move relatively to the slide when shooting.

Tanfoglio did exactly the same thing with Witness. The 380 version has the barrel fixed to the frame when firing, although instead of a notch their version has a round hole for the disassembly pin.

Of course, chambers are different too, although you cannot see it from the outside.

One last thing: the feed ramp on the barrel of BP380CC is unusually long, noticeably longer than that of BP9CC. That is because at the time cartridge feeds, the barrel of BP380CC remains in the firing position, while the barrel of BP9CC is moved to the rear and tilted down.

As far as the recoil springs being the same, it's not at all surprising. By reducing the reciprocating mass, designers at Bersa made it so the .380 version accepts a similar amount of kinetic energy into the action by the time bullet leaves the barrel. After all, the barrel of the 380 version is not included into the moving mass. Therefore, the deceleration of the slide being about the same, the power of the spring is determined by the force necessary to strip and feed the cartridge, which is also approximately the same.
 

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same grip module, same FCU, March - April ship date!
And, just like Bersa - they just put a shim in the magazine. Sounds like they will be using a lighter recoil spring also BUT CAN IT COME EVEN CLOSE TO THE P238 IN EASE OF USE? That, for me, is the $1,000.000 question. I do love my P238's and SIG is phasing them completely out, from 12 models just around 3 y3ars ago to only 3 models left in their catalog at this point in time.

I much prefer the 1911 style to the plastic fantastic stryker fired style. And this from the woman who was a totally dedicated Glock shooter for around 20 years! Who'da thunk it?

However, in a year or so, if the Gb'mt does not ban all gun ownership or come very close to doing that, I might well consider trading my S&W Shield .380 plus some money for the new SIG P365 .380............might.
 
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