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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Installed Lightning Strike's stainless steel striker today. No tools were necessary, a fingernail can press the slide's back cover's release button. Also, I used paper pads to hold the striker up to re-assemble the 2 piece spring clips.

Mr caliper had a look at both - There were only a couple very small, <0.5mm differences at the shoe ends. SIG's striker's shoe is slightly thinner at the toe, and wider at the ankle.

Their overall lengths are the same. Also, their firing pin extension's length & diameter are the same. In another ST thread Mr corey5188 showed SIG's MIM striker is 0.69g lighter than LSI's steel version. So, LSI's steel is less than 10% heavier - IMO that's not an issue...

Here's 365's striker assembly over LSI's steel striker. Notice the striker's main spring is held in place with a 2 piece ploy spring clip that's located around a collar detent or neck machined into the striker. Removing & assembling this spring clip is the crux of this task.



Disassemble is quick and easy - pull the spring back and it almost falls apart! Simply place the striker pointing up with the shoe end on a solid surface. Then pull the main spring down to release the spring from this 2 piece clip. You may need to use a fingernail to slide the spring off the clip.

*** CAUTION *** Keep a sure grip on the striker & spring to avoid parts flying away - You're gonna need all these tiny parts for re-assembly! FYI, some folks do these spring loaded tasks inside a large freezer bag...

Here are the striker parts disassembled.



Here's SIG's striker over LSI's. In this pic, the strikers' shoes are upside down on the left with the firing pin extension on the right.



Sorry this pic didn't properly focus, but SIG's striker isn't as round as LSI's. Don't think that's an issue, but it is a difference...



Re-assembly is a little more tedious. First slide the small assist spring from the firing pin end up to the shoe. Next from the pin end, slide the black ploy collar with its slotted end first & then the main spring. Easy Peasy!!

Now's the crux - I used a couple paper pads to hold the striker up while I compress the spring and insert the 2 piece poly spring clips. Again, be careful with a secure grip and do NOT have your face over & looking down on this assembly as you're working - You'll shoot your eye out!!

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content


Without taking pics, this is a 10 or 15 minute deal, so take your time. Or have a good smith do it for ya .. If he likes ya - Shouldn't cost more than $30 bucks...



Think am ready for some range FUN!!

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very nice write up and contribution! Thanks for taking the time to post and help others who may need it!
Happy to Mr incar!! I've learned sooo much here!! Am happy to post up what little I stumble into...

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Mine came yesterday. With your instructions, a gunsmith is not required.

Thanks a lot.
 
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P320 X-Compact, P320 AXG Scorpion
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Excellent write up. Thanks for sharing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks. This is supposed to be a solution to a problem that Sig should be resolving internally, no?
Yeah, IMO SIG's 365 is a great concept, but their initial production performance has been inconsistent at best...

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Nicely done

My steel striker will be here early next week, thanks for the walk through!

Upgrade/not failed replacement
 

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Disconcerting/SIG 365

Guys,
As I've just begun evaluating the 365 as an addition to my SIG inventory -- and my first-ever striker-fired SIG -- it's disconcerting to read about the 365's striker issues. I'm particularly concerned that, apparently, SIG itself has forced the creation of an after-market in strikers instead of definitively correcting the problem itself. Stated differently, if the first thing a 365 purchaser should do is replace the SIG-installed striker with an after-market replacement, then it (and we) have a significant problem. That said, I'm fairly pragmatic, so I have two questions:
--Has anyone talked directly with SIG about the issue, and if so, have they totally corrected the problem? Or should I buy a 365 with the understanding that I will promptly install an after-market striker?
--What is the website for the after-market striker that several of you have installed (and many thinks for the installation go-by).
Thanks,
Heller
 

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Guys,
As I've just begun evaluating the 365 as an addition to my SIG inventory -- and my first-ever striker-fired SIG -- it's disconcerting to read about the 365's striker issues. I'm particularly concerned that, apparently, SIG itself has forced the creation of an after-market in strikers instead of definitively correcting the problem itself. Stated differently, if the first thing a 365 purchaser should do is replace the SIG-installed striker with an after-market replacement, then it (and we) have a significant problem. That said, I'm fairly pragmatic, so I have two questions:
--Has anyone talked directly with SIG about the issue, and if so, have they totally corrected the problem? Or should I buy a 365 with the understanding that I will promptly install an after-market striker?
--What is the website for the after-market striker that several of you have installed (and many thinks for the installation go-by).
Thanks,
Heller
Welcome to SIG Talk!

Yes, SIG understands the cause of the striker problem, it was an improper chemistry with a batch of strikers they received. What I am seeing, based on posts here on SIG Talk, is that the strikers that break do so during dry fire. If you want to put your P365 under extreme duress to check whether your striker is suspect, dry fire the snot out of it. I have complete confidence in my striker. If you want to spend $100+ on a replacement striker, that is certainly your right. I own several weapons with MIM strikers and have not had issue #1 with any of them. Now go out and shoot that P365 like you stole it!
 

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Lightning Strike Products made changes to the milled 17-4SS P365 strikers after about 50 were produced to strengthen them even more. The change was in May before Sig made their changes. The radius of the striker tip was increased for even more strength.
Is there a way to know whether or not a particular Lightning Strike P365 striker is the strengthened model?
 
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